Educational Change Models

In the information based society the rate of change is very rapid. Often our perception about the world changes when we encounter new information, systems or experiences. Educators encounter different types of changes to meet the needs of students and society. Now the question educators, administers and policymakers is asking — how to deal with the change? To guide the change, Ellsworth (2000) presents a list of classical educational change models. Continue reading Educational Change Models

Stages of Concern – SPSS Syntax

The Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ) is a tool to determine where an individual is in the seven stages of concern. The 35 items and eight point Likert scale questionnaire is designed to assess the concerns of the individual/group during implementation of an innovation. The seven stages of concern are:

Stage 0 (Unconcerned)
Stage 1 (Informational)
Stage 2 (Personal)
Stage 3 (Management)
Stage 4 (Consequence)
Stage 5 (Collaboration)
Stage 6 (Refocusing)
By locating teachers’ intense stages of concern (peak stage concern) with an innovation, facilitators can develop need–specific professional development and training.

1. SPSS Syntax for finding Raw Score Total for Stage Zero to Stage Six

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage0=Q3 + Q12 + Q21 + Q23 + Q30.

EXECUTE.

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage1=Q6 + Q14 + Q15 + Q26 + Q35.

EXECUTE.

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage2=Q7 + Q13 + Q17 + Q28 + Q33.

EXECUTE.

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage3=Q4 + Q8 + Q16 + Q25 + Q34.

EXECUTE.

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage4=Q1 + Q11 + Q19 + Q24 + Q32.

EXECUTE.

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage5=Q5 + Q10 + Q18 + Q27 + Q29.

EXECUTE.

COMPUTE FiveItemRawScaleStage6=Q2 + Q9 + Q20 + Q22 + Q31.

EXECUTE.

2. SPSS Syntax for finding Percentile Score for Stage Zero to Stage Six Continue reading Stages of Concern – SPSS Syntax

A Model to Integrate Educational Technology in a Course

A Model to Integrate Educational Technology in a Course
A Model to Integrate Educational Technology in a Course

Reference

Heermann, B. (1988). Teaching and learning with computers: a guide for college faculty and administrators (1st ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Concern Theory in the Adoption of Educational Technology Research

Concern_theory_and_educational_technology
Concern Theory in Educational Technology Research Compiled from Newhouse, 2001

Reference

Newhouse, C. Paul. (2001). Applying the Concerns-based Adoption Model to Research on Computers in Classrooms. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 33(5).

Successful Technology Integration

Successful Technology Integration
Successful Technology Integration

References

Fuller, F. F. (1969). Concerns of teachers: A developmental conceptualization. American Educational Research Journal, 6(2), 207–226. doi:10.3102/00028312006002207

Hall, G. E., & Hord, S. M. (2011). Implementing change : patterns, principles, and potholes. Boston: Pearson Education.

Vaughan, W. (2002). Professional Development and the Adoption and Implementation of New Innovations: Do Teacher Concerns Matter? 6(5). IEJLL: International Electronic Journal for Leadership in Learning, 6(0). Retrieved from

Stages in Implementation Process

Implementation Process
Implementation Process – Compiled from Hawes (1993).

From the literature on models of implementation, Hawes(1993) classify four stages of implementation process.

Reference

Hawes, F. E. (1993). Academic computing from a technological innovation perspective: Faculty concerns (Ph.D.). University of Massachusetts Amherst, United States — Massachusetts.

Reusable and Reusable design: I believe, the emerging of network neutrality and Open source platform will reduce the challenges of getting rights, managing rights and Interoperability

In the chapter “Reusability and Reusable Design” is to provide an overview about the issues related to the reusability in instructional Design and Technology field. The key questions; the author Robby Robson is trying to address is what the meant by reusability and what are the requirements for the reusability. To address this question, the author is giving the information about use of Meta data, management of rights, technical interoperability and an understanding of reusable design. The main point of view presented in this chapter is – the instructional designers have to study the reusability techniques and apply them in their work. In addition instructional designers have to develop a discerning eye to use the opportunities and a practiced hand for finding the reused resources instead of building from the scratch. However, I believe the emerging ideas of network neutrality and the open source foundation would reduce the challenges of getting rights, managing rights and interoperability. There are three reasons I believe the argument of reusability and reusable design is not completely sound. Continue reading Reusable and Reusable design: I believe, the emerging of network neutrality and Open source platform will reduce the challenges of getting rights, managing rights and Interoperability

Constructivism: Apart from practice based learning, I believe good learning is accomplished only when combined with communication based learning.

Introduction

Constructivism is a theory about how people learn; ‘based on the idea that knowledge is constructed by the knower based on mental activity’ (Skaalid, 2009). The history of constructivism dates back to the days of Socrates- his dialogue with his followers. However, modern constructivism theory evolved with theories of child development and education (progressive education) by Jean Piaget and John Dewey (Wilson and Liepol, 2004). In a constructive class room, learning is built based on the previous knowledge, by active participation, by reflective methods (what they learned), collaborative, inquiry based and evolving (Wilson and Liepol, 2004). The approaches of constructivism is that learning is based on inside out rather than outside in. In other words, this theory emphasizes on practice based learning rather than communication based learning (Reiser and Dempsey, 2007, p.42 and 46). But, I think good learning is based on both practice and communication based learning. There are five reasons I believe that learning should be a combination of effective communication and practice based learning. Continue reading Constructivism: Apart from practice based learning, I believe good learning is accomplished only when combined with communication based learning.

Current Competencies and Ethical Standards for IDT practitioners: I believe, soft skills and culture has an impact on Competencies and Ethics

The main purpose of this topic “Current Competencies and ethical standards for IDT Practitioners” is to provide an overview about the current competencies and ethical standards for Instructional Design and Technology practitioners by ibstpi (International Board of Standards for Training Performance Instruction). The key ideas we need to understand in this topic are the different roles as IDT practitioners as well as the main domains of ID competencies. In order to address the above topic, the authors provide information. The roles of an IDT practitioner has been divided into three – such as instructional designers, training managers and instructors and an additional role as performance technologist. The conceptual frame work of the competence is based on four domains such as professional foundations, planning and analysis, design and development and implementation. However, I believe soft skills and culture has a huge impact on competency and ethics on an individual and organizational level. In addition, there are three reasons that I believe that the argument of this topic is not completely sound. Continue reading Current Competencies and Ethical Standards for IDT practitioners: I believe, soft skills and culture has an impact on Competencies and Ethics